Dragonflies and Damselflies

Click on an image below to view the image at a larger size.


Dragonfly Adults in Flight (Suborder: Anisoptera)

green darner in flight

green darner in flight

green darners in flight

green darners in flight

Green darner in flight

Green darner in flight

green darner in flight

green darner in flight

Pantala hymenaea

Spot wing glider (Pantala hymenaea)

Pantala hymenaea banking

A spot wing glider (Pantala hymenaea)

Pantala flavescens

A wandering glider (Pantala flavescens)

Pantala flavescens flying

Pantala flavescens (wandering glider) flying

Dragonfly swarm! Each black spot in the air in the image is a dragonfly.

Anax junius males in combat

Anax junius males in combat

Anax junius patrolling

Green darner (Anax junius) patrolling his territory

Dragonfly swarm

Dragonfly swarm

Dragonfly swarm

Dragonfly swarm

Dragonfly swarm

Dragonfly swarm

dragonfly swarm banner

Dragonfly swarm

Anax junius in flight

Anax junius in flight

mating dragonflies

Dragonflies mating (Pachydiplax longipennis). The male is the blue dragonfly on top and the female is the brown-black dragonfly on the bottom.

Tramea lacerata flying

A black saddlebags (Tramea lacerata) male flying over the algae covered water

Blue eyed darner, Rhionaeschna multicolor, flying

Blue eyed darner, Rhionaeschna multicolor, flying

Blue eyed darner, Rhionaeschna multicolor, flying

Blue eyed darner, Rhionaeschna multicolor, flying

Blue eyed darner, Rhionaeschna multicolor, flying

Blue eyed darner, Rhionaeschna multicolor, flying

Rhionaeschna multicolor

Rhionaeschna multicolor


Dragonfly Adults (Suborder: Anisoptera)

Blue dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) male

Blue dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) male

Blue dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) female

Blue dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) female

Anax junius mating pair

Green darner (Anax junius) pair.  Male is in front, female in back.

Red saddlebags male (Tramea onusta)

Red saddlebags male (Tramea onusta)

Spot-winged glider male (Pantala hymenaea)

Spot-winged glider male (Pantala hymenaea)

Wandering glider (Pantala flavescens)

Wandering glider (Pantala flavescens)

Pachydiplax longipennis

Blue dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis)

Pachydiplax longipennis obelisk

Blue dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis), obelisk position

Anax junius adult

Green Darner (Anax junius) male – notice the large wings and huge eyes!

male dragonfly genitalia

Male dragonfly genitalia (Pantala hymenaea)

Sympetrum corruptum male

Sympetrum corruptum male

Tramea lacerata

Black Saddlebags (Tramea lacerata)

Orthemis ferruginea

Roseate skimmer, Orthemis ferruginea

Perithemis intensa

Mexican amberwing, Perithemis intensa

Symetrum corruptum female

Variegated skimmer, Symetrum corruptum, female

Rhionaeshna multicolor male

Blue-eyed darner, Rhionaeshna multicolor, male

Perithemis intensa male

Mexican amberwing, Perithemis intensa, male

Pantala flavescens male

Wandering glider, Pantala flavescens, male

Pachydiplax longipennis female

Blue dasher, Pachydiplax longipennis, female

Erythemis collocata male

Western pondhawk, Erythemis collocata, male

Erythemis collocata female

Western pondhawk, Erythemis collocata, female

Dythemis nigrescens female

Black setwing, Dythemis nigrescens, female

defending territory

A male blue dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) defends his territory from a perch.

Anax laying eggs

A pair of common green darners (Anax junius) laying eggs. The males guards his female from usurpers by maintaining his hold on his mate.

Flame skimmer (Libellula saturata)

Eastern pondhawk

Eastern pondhawk (Erythemis simplicicollis) female

Pantala hymenaea male side view

Pantala hymenaea male, side view

Pachydiplax longipennis male

Pachydiplax longipennis male

Libellula saturata female

Libellula saturata female

Pachydiplax longipennis

Pachydiplax longipennis male, hanging out on a cattail leaf near the Water Ranch pond.

Sympetrum corruptum

Variegated skimmer (Sympetrum corruptum) male. He’s tilting his abdomen away from the sun to stay cool!

Sympetrum corruptum head on

Another variegated skimmer, Sympetrum corruptum, head on

Perithemis intensa male

Perithemis intensa male

dragonfly duel

A male blue dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) challenges another male in an effort to drive him away from his perch. The aggressor was largely ignored.

P. longipennis mating

Blue dashers (Pachydiplax longipennis) mating. The blue male is on top while his female drapes her body beneath him.

Libellula saturata

Female flame skimmer, Libellula saturata

Perithemis intensa dragonfly female

Perithemis intensa dragonfly female

Dragonfly wings

Dragonfly wings

dragonfly

Holding a dragonfly (Erythemis simplicicollis)

Perithemis intensa

Perithemis intensa

Pachydiplax longipennis

Pachydiplax longipennis

Anax junius

Anax junius

Pachydiplax longipennis

Pachydiplax longipennis

Anax junius over cattails

Anax junius over cattails


Damselfly Adults (Suborder: Zygoptera)

damselfly adult

Damselfly adult

damselfly adult

Damselfly adult, side view (Enallagma boreale)

male grasping female

A pair of desert firetails (Telebasis salva) shortly after the male has grabbed the female.

Ischnura barberi

Desert forktail (Ischnura barberi) female.

damselfly

Caught this damselfly when it landed on me. (Hesperagrion heterodoxum)

damselfly

Lestes damselfly


Dragonfly Nymphs (Suborder: Anisoptera)

Dragonfly nymph

Dragonfly nymph

Dragonfly cerci

Dragonfly with rear appendages highlighted

dragonfly mouthparts top

dragonfly mouthparts top

Dragonfly mouthparts side view

Dragonfly mouthparts side view

dragonfly

Dragonfly nymph, a skimmer (Family: Libellulidae)

dragonfly

Dragonfly nymph, a clubtail dragonfly (Family: Gomphidae)

Libellulid dragonfly nymph

Libellulid dragonfly nymph. Haven’t IDed this beyond family yet.


Damselfly Nymphs (Suborder: Zygoptera)

damselfly nymph

Damselfly nymph

Damselfly gills

Damselfly with gills highlighted

damselfly

Damselfly nymph, a spreadwing damselfly (Family: Lestidae)


A quick note about permissions. I am more than happy for people to use my photos in presentations, educational materials, and websites, but please acknowledge me if you do.  All images posted on websites should include a link to this blog.  I spend a lot of time and effort photographing these insects, so please be kind and let people know where you got your images.  If you wish to use them in print materials, please leave a comment below (you will be asked to enter your e mail address, which only I will be able to see) and I will contact you by e mail regarding permission.  I keep the images I post here small and relatively low resolution to save space, but I can provide higher resolution, larger photos for print if desired.

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Unless otherwise stated, all text, images, and video are copyright
© TheDragonflyWoman.com

10 thoughts on “Dragonflies and Damselflies

    • I’m so glad you like it! I enjoy sharing my love of insects with the world, so if you’re finding things you like and learning new things, I consider that one of the best compliments I could receive!

  1. I enjoyed your web site. I have always enjoyed looking at dragonflies but this week I observed my first swarm… It was so awesome! There were millions and they were all so big. We were at Ponce de Leon park in Punta Gorda, FL USA on Thursday March 15th just before sunset and also Sat. March 17 at sunset. I will always remember it.

    • I’m so thrilled that you got to see such a huge swarm and that you enjoyed it so much! I think the dragonfly swarms are magical experiences, so I’m always happy to hear that other people share my outlook on them.

  2. I do not have such a big swarm but I do have about 20 to 30 dragonflies that are always in my back yard. They have been like this for two years now. Needless to say I love to sit and watch them, but I was also told they were called snake doctors and are usually where snakes are (?). I dont mind snakes, but I was wondering why we have so many. :) as we are having an unusually warm spring here in way upstate NY, maybe that is the reason. Love looking at the pictures and thank you for all the info !!!

    • The snake doctor common name for dragonflies is related to old European legends about dragonflies being associated with the devil. Devil = serpent, so his harbingers of evils (the dragonflies) became associated with snakes. They’re not really associated with snakes, and those old European legends are needlessly dark and scary and mostly generate fear and misinformation about harmless insects. In Asia, dragonflies tend to be considered signs of life and prosperity, so it’s all a matter of your background. Dragonflies are great hunters of the annoying little pest insects you’d rather not have in your yard (mosquitoes, blackflies, and the like), so enjoy your little swarm. They’re doing you a good service and are beautiful to boot!

    • Insects are cool, but dragons and damsels are extra cool as far as I’m concerned. And I’ll definitely check out your post! Just need to find a few spare minutes to give it a good look.

  3. My love for dragonflies really kicked in last year. We recently moved to a new home 4 months ago and we have a lot of dragonflies and they seem to like me because they often come sit on my hand or my knee when I’m sitting on my deck. I found two mating about a week ago hanging from a big zinnia and took some pictures which led me to your site. Thank you for sharing your pics and info.

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