Swarm Report: 1/1/2017 – 5/19/17

Dragonfly Swarm Project logo

I am so very behind on getting data from the Dragonfly Swarm Project shared here, but I wanted to get the data from this year so far up!  Here’s what I’ve gotten since the beginning of 2017:

USA:

Palm Springs, CA
Dewey Beach, DE
Jupiter, FL
Naples, FL
Okeechobee, FL
Sarasota, FL
Titusville, FL
Elizabeth City, NC
Hampton, VA
Virginia Beach, VA (x2)

Aruba:

Eagle Beach

Australia:

Adelaiade, South Australia
Moana, South Australia
Port Elliot, South Australia
Aspley, Victoria
Perth, Western Australia (x3)

Cambodia:

Kep

Mozambique:

Pemba, Cabo Delgado
Inhambane City, Inhambane Province

Panama:

Jaramillo, Chiriqui

Zimbabwe:

Dubbo

I will add the map soon!  I have a bad internet connection and am having a hard time getting Google Earth to work…

Australia hasn’t been very well represented in the last few years, but made a bit of a comeback on the western side of the country during their early fall.  The US sightings so far are fairly normal – a few sightings, mostly in the south – but there is an interesting data point in Delaware that suggests the dragonfly season may have started a bit earlier in the US this year.

I’m very excited to be able to add some new countries to my list!  Mozambique, Aruba, and Zimbabwe are all new, and the sighting in Cambodia is only the second sighting reported from that country.  I know part of this has to do with the fact that all my information and data forms are in English and I know there are far more sightings reported worldwide than I have reported to me, but I’m excited that the list of countries is now 38 strong.

If you love dragonflies, I hope you’ll be on the lookout for swarms again this year!  I’m recommitting myself to sharing data here this year and will also keep you updated as I work to prepare the first publication for this project!  I might have disappeared a bit over the last year, but the project is still going strong and I’m excited to start a new season of the Dragonfly Swarm Project.

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Have you seen a dragonfly swarm? I am tracking swarms so I can learn more about this interesting behavior.  If you see one, I’d love to hear from you!  Please visit my Report a Dragonfly Swarm page to fill out the official report form.  It only takes a few minutes! Thanks!

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Want more information? Visit my dragonfly swarm information page for my entire collection of posts about dragonfly swarms!

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Unless otherwise stated, all text, images, and video are copyright © C. L. Goforth

Swarm Sunday: 11/9/14 – 11/22/14

Dragonfly Swarm Project logo

 

Just a few swarms to report from the last few weeks:

USA:

Tracy, CA

Spain:

Estepona

And here is the US map for the last two weeks:

Swarm map 11.8.14 to 11.22.14

Red pins are static swarms, yellow pins are migratory. Click the map to enlarge!

Only 2 swarms in two weeks, but both were migratory, including one international sighting in Spain.  At this point I’ll be surprised if we see any more swarming in the northern hemisphere before the end of the year, but please do report swarms if you see them!  Any northern swarms from here through March will be very exciting.

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Have you seen a dragonfly swarm? I am tracking swarms so I can learn more about this interesting behavior.  If you see one, I’d love to hear from you!  Please visit my Report a Dragonfly Swarm page to fill out the official report form.  It only takes a few minutes! Thanks!

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Want more information? Visit my dragonfly swarm information page for my entire collection of posts about dragonfly swarms!

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Unless otherwise stated, all text, images, and video are copyright © C. L. Goforth

Swarm Sunday: 10/26/14 – 11/8/14

Dragonfly Swarm Project logo

 

The swarming activity is going way down as the weather begins to cool, but swarm reports came in from the following locations over the past few weeks:

USA:

Shadow Hills, CA
Piscataway, NJ
Manhatten, KS

Argentina:

Mar Del Plata

And here is the US map for the last two weeks:

 

2014 10 27 to 11 8

Red pins are static swarms, yellow pins are migratory. Click the map to enlarge!

Only 4 swarms in two weeks, so the swarming activity is clearly slowing down.  It is getting cooler in many parts of the country and the abundance of dragonflies is going down with it.  But, there are still a few dragonflies out there!  The two American static swarms took place fairly far north, and there was even one migratory swarm in California.  These swarms are quite late in the year (four weeks late!) and I wouldn’t be surprised if we get just a few more.  That’s super cool!

So keep looking for a few weeks more and report any swarms you see!  Would love to have a swarm report from the middle of November, just to see if it’s possible.

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Have you seen a dragonfly swarm? I am tracking swarms so I can learn more about this interesting behavior.  If you see one, I’d love to hear from you!  Please visit my Report a Dragonfly Swarm page to fill out the official report form.  It only takes a few minutes! Thanks!

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Want more information? Visit my dragonfly swarm information page for my entire collection of posts about dragonfly swarms!

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Unless otherwise stated, all text, images, and video are copyright © C. L. Goforth

Swarm Sunday: 10/1/14 – 10/26/14

Dragonfly Swarm Project logo

I am all kinds of behind on my weekly swarm reports, but I’m trying to get caught up!  Rather than bombard you all with a bunch of swarm posts all at once, today I am going to focus only on the swarms that have been reported so far this month. I’ll post the other weeks as weekly swarm posts, but I am going to backdate them so that they fit in where they should have earlier this summer.  Once I get them posted, I’ll make another post here that includes links to all of these new posts containing the data from August and September.  Then because the season is mostly over now, I’ll start my yearly wrap-up posts.  Getting caught up!  Woo!

Swarm reports came from the following locations in October:

USA:

Anniston, AL
Orange Beach, AL
Weed, CA
Hoschton, GA
Rolla, MO
Lexington, SC
Coldspring, TX
Denton, TX
Plano, TX
Talty, TX
Waxahachie, TX

Thailand:

Chaloklum, Koh Phagnan

And here is the map for the month:

Dragonfly swarms 2014 10 1 to 26

Red pins are static swarms, yellow pins are migratory. Click the map to enlarge!

Most of the activity that has taken place this month has, unsurprisingly, taken place in the southern US, with one notable American exception in northern California and a foreign swarm in Thailand (new country, and brings the total up to 26!).  Swarm reports have slowed way down, as expected at this time of year, but I did receive a report of a swarm that took place today.  That is quite late for a dragonfly swarm in the US and supports my idea that the swarm season would be shifted a few weeks later this year. Normally the last report trickles in around mid-October, but there were several reports submitted at that time and a few more reported after that date.  Interesting!

The Dragonfly Swarm Project is still going strong, even if I haven’t been able to get the data online in a timely manner recently, so please keep sending in your reports if you see swarms.  These late season swarms are quite interesting, so keep an eye out for unseasonable swarming in your area!

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Have you seen a dragonfly swarm? I am tracking swarms so I can learn more about this interesting behavior.  If you see one, I’d love to hear from you!  Please visit my Report a Dragonfly Swarm page to fill out the official report form.  It only takes a few minutes! Thanks!

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Want more information? Visit my dragonfly swarm information page for my entire collection of posts about dragonfly swarms!

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Unless otherwise stated, all text, images, and video are copyright © C. L. Goforth

Swarm Sunday: 7/6/14 – 7/19/14

Dragonfly Swarm Project logo

I didn’t have a chance to post last week, so what you see here represents two weeks of data.  Swarm reports came from the following locations:

USA:

Scottsdale, AZ
Butlerville, AK
Chico, CA
Flagler, CO
Duluth, MN
Brick, NJ
Ocean City, NJ (2 reports)
Williamstown, NJ
Houston, TX
Pflugerville, TX
Rockwall, TX
Mathews, VA

Canada:

Calgary, AB (2 reports)
Miramichi, NB
Vulcan, AB

Ireland:

Celbridge, County Kildare

And here are the maps for the last two weeks:

swarms 7.6.14 to 7.12.14

7/6/14 to 7/12/14

 

swarms 7.13.14 to 7.19.14

7/13/14 to 7/19/14

Red pins are static swarms, yellow pins are migratory. Click the maps to enlarge!

There has been a little upswing in activity in the past few weeks, which I’m excited about.  Over the last week, there were four migratory swarms (though only one really shows up on the map – two are under other pins and one is outside of North America), so there’s been at least a little movement.  Texas continues to have regular activity, New Jersey had a small event, and California showed up on the map last week.  The most exciting thing to me is the report from Ireland though!  That’s a new country for the Dragonfly Swarm Project and brings the total number of countries where swarms have been reported to 23.  There’s been a pretty even spread so far too, with all continents except Antarctica (for obvious reasons) and Africa (no idea why) well represented.

This last week, I got to talk about my project for an educational podcast geared at 4th and 5th graders, and I’ll post a link if I get public access to the final product online.  I’m also excited about some upcoming promotion of my project that I’ll tell you about once I know more details!  It’s fun spreading the word about dragonfly swarms and what it’s like doing insect behavior work with citizen scientists, so I’m looking forward to sharing the results of these with you all in the next few weeks.

If the trend from the past four years holds true, we’re coming up on peak season for dragonfly swarms here soon.  It will be very interesting to see what happens, so send in your data!  I can’t wait to see what happens this season!

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Have you seen a dragonfly swarm? I am tracking swarms so I can learn more about this interesting behavior.  If you see one, I’d love to hear from you!  Please visit my Report a Dragonfly Swarm page to fill out the official report form.  It only takes a few minutes! Thanks!

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Want more information? Visit my dragonfly swarm information page for my entire collection of posts about dragonfly swarms!

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Unless otherwise stated, all text, images, and video are copyright © C. L. Goforth

Swarm Sunday: 6/22/14 to 7/5/14

Dragonfly Swarm Project logo

I didn’t have a chance to post last week, so what you see here represents two weeks of data.  Swarm reports came from the following locations:

USA:

Leesburg, FL
Miami Beach, FL
Milton, FL
Parkland, FL
Livermore, ME
Marbury, MD
West Bend, MD
Lakeway, TX
Ogden, UT
Williamsburg, VA

And here are the maps for the last two weeks:

6.22.14 to 6.28.14

6/22/14 through 6/28/14

6.29.14 to 7.5.14

6/29/14 through 7/5/14

 

Red pins are static swarms, yellow pins are migratory. Click the map to enlarge!

It continues to be a little slow so far this year, though there was one migratory swarm reported from Utah this week, which is exciting.  There has been rather consistent activity in the southeastern part of Texas over the last month, though nothing really extraordinary seems to be happening anywhere so far.  Hurricane Arthur didn’t even seem to stir anything up!  I’m still hoping things will pick up soon, but you never know.

One thing has disturbed me though.  In the past several years, green darners have made appearances in swarms over and over again.  They often form the bulk of swarms.  This year, very few people have described anything that sounds like a green darner from their swarms.  I’ve also started to hear some ominous rumblings on the odonate listservs and Facebook pages where people have started to ask where the green darners are this year.  People have really started to notice their near absence, which isn’t good.  We typically have a lot of darners at the pond at the field station where I work, but this year I haven’t seen many at all, maybe 5 or 6 total.  At this time of year, we should have 5-6 on the pond every day, not 5-6 for the entire season!  There’s always a chance things are just terribly late this year and things will normalize at some point, but I’ve personally noticed some weird things happening this year.  Monarchs are out in North Carolina in droves right now, and they’re normally long gone for the heat of the summer, having migrated further north.  The common milkweed is going absolute gangbusters, but there are several conspicuously common butterflies (eastern tiger swallowtails and pipevine swallowtails among them) that are well below their normal numbers this year.  Fireflies are STILL out here, and the June bugs emerged a week or two early.  Have any of you noticed similar things out of whack in your area?  I shouldn’t extrapolate what I’m seeing in North Carolina to the rest of the country, even the rest of the east coast, but I’ve heard enough from other entomologists on social media to think that this is going to be an odd year.  It will be interesting to see if this ends up being a weird swarming year too!

Keep reporting those swarms!  Was very pleased to see swarm reports from several regular readers over the last couple of weeks.  Thanks everyone!!

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Have you seen a dragonfly swarm? I am tracking swarms so I can learn more about this interesting behavior.  If you see one, I’d love to hear from you!  Please visit my Report a Dragonfly Swarm page to fill out the official report form.  It only takes a few minutes! Thanks!

_______________

Want more information? Visit my dragonfly swarm information page for my entire collection of posts about dragonfly swarms!

_______________

Unless otherwise stated, all text, images, and video are copyright © C. L. Goforth

Swarm Sunday: 6/15/14 to 6/21/14

Dragonfly Swarm Project logo

Another slow week for dragonfly swarms this week.  I received reports from the following locations::

USA:

Panama City, FL
Petersburg, FL
South Pasadena, FL
Walker, MN
Gastonia, NC

And here’s the map:

6.15.14 to 6.21.14

 

Red pins are static swarms, yellow pins are migratory. Click the map to enlarge!

Almost every swarm reported this week was in the south, with the exception of the one lone report from Minnesota.  I’m hoping things will start picking up this week, but I guess I’ll just have to see what the week brings!

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Have you seen a dragonfly swarm? I am tracking swarms so I can learn more about this interesting behavior.  If you see one, I’d love to hear from you!  Please visit my Report a Dragonfly Swarm page to fill out the official report form.  It only takes a few minutes! Thanks!

_______________

Want more information? Visit my dragonfly swarm information page for my entire collection of posts about dragonfly swarms!

_______________

Unless otherwise stated, all text, images, and video are copyright © C. L. Goforth